Blogging Archaeology – Why I started, why I still blog and why I will keep blogging

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Blogging Archaeology

I had seen his post about the SAA 2014 blogging in archaeology session and the archaeological blogging carnival and I thought: shame, interesting but no time. Then I received an email from Doug (thank you for organising this!) And it started to nag me. I could not stop thinking that it’s good to think about these issues once every while. And it nagged and it nagged. Until yesterday morning in the shower the post was writing itself in my head. Bloggers unite and join #blogarch! I will and I will enjoy reading why other archaeological bloggers are blogging. Besides, what better to do on a snowy winter’s morning than blog about archaeology?

How does it work: Each month leading up to the SAA he will post a question. If you would like to answer this question, you blog about it, as will hopefully do a lot of other archaeology bloggers.

Why do I blog?

It all started about six years ago. I was not satisfied with the possibilities my department’s website gave me in developing my on-line presence. Over a few beers with my friend Ben (from the fantastic Version1) we discussed the possibilities and we came to the conclusions, it had to be a blog. So, I went on-line and discovered that there was a small community of blogging archaeologists, mostly young researchers and almost all in the English speaking world. It felt quite exciting to join them. So, I started hazelnut_relations and initially I set it up mostly as an online profile.

Soon it dawned on me this wordpress blog thing allowed me not only to build my own online profile, but that really it is a platform I could write on, about anything I wanted to write about! Ha! I liked writing and thought it might be good practice, if not a bit scary to do so in public. I was going to write about anything in archaeology I was interested in, whether Swiss archaeology, interesting bits of archaeological news, publications, my lost love The Palaeolithic, and my own research of course. My then unfunded PhD research progressed only ever so slowly while I was working pretty much full-time in archaeological services. Slowly, I found my niche in Swiss Archaeology, though. Over time I also felt I was finding my voice and was having more and more fun blogging.

Why am I still blogging?

I don’t think I have to explain to you how important it is that we, archaeologists, share our work with others. As a PhD student I have no budget for this, but I don’ need to: the blog is free and allows me to share my work and what we are finding out about our past, whether it is my PhD research or other projects I am involved in.

Secondly, blogging allows me to share this, not only with the general public, but also with fellow archaeologists near and far, with my friends and family and with the stakeholders in my project. This latter point has become more important since I became part of a larger project and we got funding for our project in October 2012 and the number of stakeholders subsequently increased significantly (but do you read this blog at all, stakeholders?). Thirdly, this public funding also increases our obligation to communicate our work.

The funding has had an influence on my blogging in yet another way: It meant I am now working full-time on my PhD and only do a few small research projects on the side, allowing me to specialise. Regular readers know that these days I focus mostly on alpine archaeology and on microscopic use wear analysis of Late Mesolithic chipped stone artefacts. As far as I am aware I am the only blogging Swiss archaeology PhD student. And in general, only a few Swiss archaeologists are professionally active on social media. A shame, I think (JOIN ME!), as, really, although I am not originally from Switzerland, I am quite proud of the work that we do here and I am determined to brag about it!

Point five: The Mesolithic is a fascinating part of human history. Be honest, who can resist being intrigued by the changes taking places during the early Holocene, as the ice retreated and new wonderful ideas and foods and knowledge arrived in our parts of the world? So, as a colleague once wrote to me: “Long Live The Mesolithic!

Why do you blog and still blog? I think to answer that you have to also answer the question: who you write for? However, the question of audience is particular tricky in my case.

I work in country with four official languages and working and living in regions that are officially bilingual, doesn’t make it easier. Working here it is also impossible not to connect with the German, French and Italian speaking regions only a stone’s throw away. Moreover, one of my supervisors is from the UK and the world of use wear analysis is quite international. In the end I decided on writing in English, but even after almost six years I am not completely sure about this decision. On the one side, would you be reading this had I written this in German or French? On the other hand, I fear I now exclude some of the local general public. So, who do I write for?

Actually, although I am truly grateful for and – to be honest – really quite flattered by the small audience I have out there and I really hope you enjoy coming by here once every while (let me know who you are sometime!), I think I mostly write for myself. The writing really is good practice and sometimes writing for my blog about issues I am dealing with in my research helps me thinking them through. It forces me to think clearly and more honestly. It is a bit like a mental purification. Sometimes, I even start writing a blog post that then does not even make it onto the blog and turns into part of my thesis or an article. By now, I see this blog as an intregral part of my PhD and professional identity.

So, that is why I blog and am still blogging and will keep blogging for a while.

P.S. But I would not mind if blogging, or science communication in general, also got some sort of support from my department, faculty or university. (If only it would qualify for an ECTS point. I need 12 for my PhD, thank you very much.)

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7 responses to “Blogging Archaeology – Why I started, why I still blog and why I will keep blogging

  1. “Long Live the Mesolithic!” I wholeheartedly agree. Much enjoyed this read, as I do your posts. There aren’t many Mesobloggers around which is a real shame indeed. Doug is on my case too and you’ve nudged me toward my own post on http://www.microburin.com – I’ll carve out some knapping time this weekend. How can I not? Blogging is addictive and knowing there’s a (small) community of like-minded souls is comforting. We all face the same challenges, epiphanies, hurdles, and excitement.
    Best wishes,
    Spence | populating the mesolithic : stones tell stories : resonating places

    • Thanks for your kind words, Spencer! Yes, we are but a small community of active Mesobloggers. So keep up the good work! Perhaps we can convince some fellow researchers to join the party that way. So, if you are out there, Mesolithic researchers, it would be great to read what you’re up to in an informal way, on a blog, on twitter etc!

  2. Any method of capturing the daily thoughts and experiences of working archaeologists is important – so much of what really contributes to the shaping of archaeological knowledge still fails to make it into the official record. It’s not just that blogging creates an “alternative” record of archaeological experience – in the case of many specialist areas of study (mesolithic stone tools, for example) or practice (archaeological illustration – my own particular tiny field!), it’s the only record of that experience! Hurrah for small, speciality archaeological blogs like this one!

    • I wholeheartedly agree. And as an archaeologist, I especially enjoy reading about these processes going on behind the closed doors of labs, offices and trenches of other archaeologists (and other scientists). And I bet lots of non-archaeologists do as well. Hurrah!

  3. Pingback: Why do I blog? And on archaeology, for Heaven´s sake? #blogarch | Sprache der Dinge

  4. Pingback: Blogging Archaeology – The Good, the bad and the Ugly at Hazelnut Relations and beyond | hazelnut relations

  5. Pingback: Blogging Archaeology – Join us! | hazelnut relations

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